Tag Archives: Jakesprinter

Sunday Post: Unforgettable

water-snake-2013

Unforgettable means never to be forgotten, remarkable in a way that cannot be forgotten such as place, events or great memories.  As much as I forget appointments, and names these are some experiences I won’t forget.

I really thought parasailing was going to be much more thrilling frightening than it was.  I waited until the two little girls that were on the boat with us went first.  I figured if they could do it, I could.  V did  not want to try it.   It felt like I was in a squeaky Ferris Wheel seat that was a little too tight.  V was the one who was really having the unforgettable time.  This former Navy guy found out that boat rides on the ocean were better off forgotten.

horseback-13

I tend to overestimate what I might like to can do.  I assume I will like it until I try it.  The next trip to Hawaii brought me another adventure I would never forget, and so I crossed it off my to-do list forever.  That smile was pained.  Riding up the dusty mountain was difficult, coming back down and trying to keep my mare on the path with the rest of the folks instead of careening off the path in search of greenery…

Revolutionary War Military Life

The final unforgettable memory I’m going to share today was from one of the most memorable weeks of my life.  A trip with teachers from across the United States to Colonial Williamsburg.  Every minute was packed with adventures.  In this shot we were learning how the soldiers cooked their food in outdoor ovens with a walk around path while they were on the battlefield.  Our week included visits to Yorktown and Jamestown as well.  If you like United States History, this is a place to spend some time.

Thanks for joining me for a few unforgettable experiences.  Jakesprinter has many more to share with you that will spark your ideas.

 

 

 

Sunday Post: Natural Resources

I’ve been hoping for a challenge in which I could post these photos of wind machines.  Thanks Jake.  Air is probably our most precious and abused natural resource in California Our EPA regulations for air quality are the most stringent in the United States.  Yet, for all it’s poor quality from times and in places, air can still be harnessed and used to produce another clean energy – electricity.

I read this morning on Pairodox Farm’s blog that my home state of Indiana, “the Fowler Ridge wind farm is one of the largest installations of its sort in the world. It ranges over 50,000 acres and is currently comprised of more than 300 wind turbines which can generate enough carbon-free electricity for nearly 200,000 homes.

I pulled off the freeway just before an exit going to Palm Springs to get these pictures.  I used the 75-300 lens.  You can see that the air is hazy.  Had I pulled off the road on Saturday instead of Monday, the sky would have been blue.  Rats!!!These photos have not been altered in any way except to imprint my moniker in the sky.Developed in the 1980s the  San Gorgonio Pass Wind Farm, one of three large wind farms in CA, consists of 3,218 units delivering 615 MW.[1]This wind farm spans the I 10.  This is one of the windiest places in California.

Featured Blog

Pairodox Farm is my choice for today.  Their website is about sustainable living in rural Pennsylvania, but I think their ideas can apply to all of us. The reason they are a pairodox is because in real life they are a pair of docs, one in zoology and in plant ecology.  In spite of all that science in their educational background they actually speak English.

A Pair of Docs in Pennsylvania

To participate in Jakesprinter’s Sunday Post

1. Each week, he will provide a theme for creative inspiration. Show the world based on your interpretation what you have in mind for the theme, and post them on your blog anytime before the following Sunday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. Subscribe to jakesprinter so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements. Sign up via the email subscription link in the sidebar or RSS.

So I learned something today.  How about you?

Here are some of the participants gathered by rfljenksy – Practicing Simplicity.  Check his out, then you have lots of other examples also!  Thanks!!!

  1. SUNDAY POST: Natural Resources | Tea with a Pirate -
  2. sunday post : natural resources | bodhisattvaintraining
  3. Windmill at Sunset | Canoe Communications
  4. Sunday Post: Natural Resources…The Children of the World
  5. Eye candy | Thirdeyemom
  6. The Giving Tree | Thirdeyemom
  7. Sunday Post: Natural Resources « patriciaddrury
  8. SUNDAY POST : Natural Resources | tahira’s shenanigans
  9. Sunday Post:  Natural Resources -Another Day in Paradise
  10. Sunday Post : Natural Resources « restlessjo
  11. Positive Parental Participation
  12. Natural Resources. « Luddy’s Lens
  13. Jake’s Sunday Post: Natural Resources | A Number of Things
  14. BAMBOO- A Natural Resource « Zeebra Designs & Destinations
  15. If a tree falls | Beyond the Brush
  16. Jake’s Sunday Post theme: Natural resources « newsferret
  17. Tell me, was it one of those days? | The Wanderlust Gene
  18. Longing « Stray Thoughts
  19. SUNDAY POST: Natural Resources Wool | Cee’s Life Photography
  20. Wind Turbines | Figments of a DuTchess

Sunday Post: Architecture

If you haven’t been to http://jakesprinters.wordpress.com/2012/11/17/sunday-post-architecture/#comments , and you like photography, and you need ideas for a short posts, Jake is your guy.  I love this because even as amateur photographers everyone usually has tons of pictures that sit unseen by anyone but a file folder.  This is a reason to open up those dusty folders, and pick out our best work.

Seattle came to its own during the 1962 Worlds Fair, and even today, 50 years later, the Space Needle dominates the cityscape.

The Space Needle still towers over Seattle skyscrapers to reign king.

Alien influence reigned supreme in the post-Roswell, New Mexico 1960s after aliens visited in 1947.  They introduced everything round into architecture.  Although the Space Needle is still grounded, it resembles a giant flying saucer, complete with windows all the way around.  The top-rated restaurant makes one revolution per hour.  If you go for dinner check to make sure your credit card is NOT maxed out before enter the man-operated elevator.

According to Wiki, the Needle was the tallest building west of the Mississippi when it first peeped its head out.  It was built to withstand high winds, and you will definitely feel them if you go outside on the walk around the observation deck at about 500 feet above the street.  But don’t worry.  You are safe from structural calamity up to a gust of 201 mph.  Ordinary gusts may be too great for your to keep a hold on your camera as you steady yourself against the ledge to get a great picture.

By the way I did not remove any of the color from this photograph which I took from my 15 story hotel room about a mile away from the Needle.

Here are some other challenges that I liked.

Here’s how the weekly photo Competition works:

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. Show the world based on your interpretation what you have in mind for the theme, and post them on your blog anytime before the following Sunday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. Subscribe to jakesprinter so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements. Sign up via the email subscription link in the sidebar or RSS.

GET THE BADGE FOR YOUR IMAGE WIDGET….

 

 

Sunday Post: People

 

Ok, this post is for Jake.  I hope I will get his dragon posted in correctly so you can see his amazing 3D people.  My people are doing similar things, but they are flat, and a wee bit older (or at least some of them are!! – not mentioning any names!)

 

We were at a not-so-boring California Council for the Social Studies Board meeting.  Just when things might have gotten dull, our President, Brent Heath, enlivened us with the help of his wife.

break dancing – I mean dancing during the break.
Meeting energized

 

 

Sunday Post: Favorite Spot

Thanks to Amy for leading me to Jake who has the Sunday Post Challenge.  I have to think about where my favorite spot is, but I know it faces north.  I love to sit at the dining room table and write my blog, answer emails, and, or course, eat. I think I could sit here all day, but that wouldn’t be good for me.  When we first made an offer on this house, it was a HUD repo, and we couldn’t get inside, so we drove our pick-up out, pulled out the tailgate and began planning our dream home.

Where we used to park our pick-up.

We now have a patio there, and we go out and enjoy coffee out there, or on the front porch facing north.

Marsha’s Foothill  I didn’t plant the flag, though.

The reason for the northern direction is that there is a huge foothill at the end of our street, and you just can’t go any farther.  When I taught 4th grade, we brought our students on a bike trip out along this street and over the fence so that we could climb the foothill and see the Native American painted rocks in a little cave.  We loved to sit down and eat by the mortar holes where the native women ground acorns into flour.

Our neighbors called our foothill Marsha’s Foothill for a while because of the small incident I had up there.  My friend and I were hiking, and of course all the neighbor kids wanted to go with us.  So we started off.  The older kids, and my friend went on ahead leaving me to help the littlest member of our party, A 5-year-old little girl.  I had to lift her all the way because it was really too steep for her.  Big clue.  If they can’t climb it, don’t do the work for them!!! NO MATTER HOW MUCH THEY BEG TO GO WITH YOU!!!  We got to the top and discovered that everyone had jumped across the gap between the boulders.  The gap looks like no big deal from where I drink my coffee in the morning, but up there the gap widens.  I knew I couldn’t lift, throw, or otherwise transport her over the gap, so we decided to go back down.  All of the sudden the ledges shrank, and I didn’t trust her stay put on a little ledge and move on by herself while I climbed onto the ledge myself.  There surely wasn’t room for both of our little feet at the same time.

So we sat up there and talked.  I asked her if her mother hadn’t minded that she climbed up to the top of the foothill.  Big clue #2  When in doubt ask the mom for permission to take kids with you ANYWHERE- even if the kids beg and beg, and your friend is an attorney.

“Oh, she doesn’t know,” she told me innocently.  “She thinks I’m in bed.  I have strep throat.”

So there I was at the top of the hill with a sick 5-year-old at about 4:30 p.m. on a December afternoon.  The rest of the group was on their way down, but struggling and not wanting to come back over the GAP to help us.  We sat and visited. AND PRAYED.

Soon my friend’s and my husbands ventured by wondering why our walk was taking so long.  Neither of them felt like tackling up the steep incline.  I didn’t think it was that bad going up.  They went and got the little girl’s father.  Fortunately for me, the parents were good-natured about the incident.  It was no big deal for me to hand the little girl down to her dad’s waiting arms, so we were down that hill in no time, and I’ve never gone back up it.  The dad renamed the hill, and we laughed about it later.I still love to look north to the foothills from my home.  Marsha’s Foothill IS my favorite spot, I just don’t want to occupy it.